Black Mother of Two Who Died in Hurricane Sandy Was Refused Help By White Man

A black mother of two who died in Hurricane Sandy was refused help by a Staten Island resident. Having seen for myself the look of desperation on the faces of people only hours removed from Hurricane Katrina when it hit New Orléans in 2005. The following story of how a mother lost her two children after seeking help to escape the ravaging storm conditions doesn’t sit well with me. It reminds me of the countless stories of death and survival recounted by victims of Hurricane Katrina in the days and months after the storm.

This from CNN.com:

(Staten Island, NY) Police in Staten Island, New York have found the bodies of two brothers, Brandon and Connor Moore, swept out of their mother’s arms by floodwaters during Superstorm Sandy. The grim discovery was made this morning by NYPD divers in a marsh.

Staten Island Borough President James Molinaro says the boys, ages 4 and 2, were found “maybe a block or two from where [their mother] lost them.” The parents were there when police found the boys.

According to police, the boys’ mother, Glenda, stopped at a man’s house after her SUV hit a hole during the storm.

She begged for help and asked to come inside, but that man said no.

Soon after, the mother and her two children were hit by a massive wall of water.

The mother desperately tried to hold onto them, but the force of the water was too much.

Her two boys were carried away in the deadly floodwaters.

Somehow the mother managed to survive.

CNN’s Gary Tuchman talked with Alan, the man believed to have rejected her plea for help. He’s telling a much different story.

The mother of the two children, Glenda Moore, was black. Now I’m not going to go as far as to say that there was a racial component to this story since Alvin — the man who refused to help — was white. However, after watching the following video, it’s pretty obvious that race mattered.

After the boys disappeared, Mrs Moore knocked on a nearby door for help but was told: ‘I don’t know you. I’m not going to help you.’

Mrs Moore then tried another neighbor near her Staten Island home, but when she rang the bell they turned off the lights and refused to answer.

As the storm raged around her, the nurse took shelter in a doorstep, screaming and staring at the waters which had just snatched away her children.

Twelve hours later, at dawn when the weather calmed down, she found the strength to walk down the street and flag down a passing police car to raise the alarm. (source)

Watch the following to understand: